One spirit in the dark

There’s a chant out there from the Spiral Rhythm CD I Am – that goes

One spirit in the dark, like a candle wavers.
Many spirits joined as one, burn with the power of the blazing sun.
There is strength in community, the circle empowers you and me.
The circle binds yet sets us free, as we will, so mote it be.

I listened tonight, as I walked home from my evening reference shift at work (random music shuffle is a form of divination and sometimes consolation) while I was thinking about a recent post on the blog Making Light which essentially asks “What happens when new spiritual experience opens up under our feet, and we’re not sure what to do with it?”

My answer is far too long for a comment there – and I knew this before I even started typing – so I figured it would be a fine post here instead. (Look! This blog still exists! Really!)

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A response to “What’s for dinner?”

Dianne Sylvan asked this question in  a blog post yesterday, and I wanted to take time to do a more extensive response – both ’cause she’s a friend, and bec ause it’s part of my “I should talk about this sustainable priestessing thing here” goal for this year and this blog.

So, here goes: this post has a quickish overview of where my food habits are at the moment, where they’ve been over the past 18 months, and some staple meals that seem to be working pretty well for me, even if I’m tired.

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Changing perspectives

I still have lots of posts I’m mulling over that will be more in depth, but a relatively quick thought. (erm. For me. It’s still about 600 words.)

I’ve alluded here and other places that the medical foo of the last year has changed some stuff for me. That’s been true in terms of managing energy in ritual and magical work, but I’ve also been mulling over what’s changed for me in other ways.

One of them, apparently, is how my intuition kicks in.

Last week, I went to Boston for a combination of a job hiring conference, and in the hopes of arranging a few other visits with jobs out there in the process (and seeing my mother and college friends who are in the area.)

Now, as you all probably know, Boston was one of the places that got hit by massive snow storm last week – about 18″ in the course of 36 hours (and on top of masses of other snow that mean clearing the new stuff is particularly difficult.)

When I was booking my flight, I got the very strong pull that I should do two things. First, that it would be very smart to fly in on Tuesday, rather than Thursday (the hiring conference started Friday), and second that flying non-stop would be a very smart thing.

Both these things are logical, in their way. It’s been a *weird* winter for weather, so not flying through another city that might get snowbound (Chicago and Milwaukee are my two most likely stops, and I’ve done Indianapolis in the past) might make sense. And leaving time for travel delays in general is also smart.

As it turns out: all three of those cities shut down for snow: I would not have made a connecting flight on Tuesday out of any of them, and might well have gotten stuck at whatever airport for the duration.

Equally, my original flight (10:45am on Tuesday) got cancelled, but in enough time to reschedule me on the 7am flight. Which was, at it turns out, the last flight into Boston’s Logan airport before they shut down the airport on Tuesday for a bit. (With a superb landing.)

So, all at once, that initial intuition – fly Tuesday, fly non-stop – and the circumstances lined up in a way to get me where I wanted, when I wanted, and safely. (And as a bonus, *because* of the weather, I got a chance to go see a dear friend and her toddler and the rest of her family when I wasn’t expecting to be able to make it out there, because someone was handy to leave work early to pick me up from the bus. Worth every minute of travel.)

While I’ve had things like that in the past, those moments where the intuition comes alive and connects and everything falls into place, the way this felt was different. Previously, that kind of intuition had a rapid crescendo behind it, for lack of a better way to phrase it, a sudden burst of “Oh, *that* thing, this big shiny thing over there.” This time, it was just … there. Very firmly, but also very quietly. Waiting for me to do the needful stuff with it. Like a bit of granite, slowly being revealed by a retreating glacier, rather than fireworks.

It’s cool that it worked. But it’s also a reminder of the fact a lot of fundamental things have shifted for me, and that I can’t assume that what worked in the past is going to continue to do so (or if it still works, that it’s the most effective way to do so.)

I’m still figuring out what that means. And in particular, what it means about how I should change my practice, my daily attention, etc. to take advantage of it.

Health and Craft – more general thoughts

(A note here that my experiences and thoughts are focused on initiatory small-group work – in other words, stuff that is deliberately designed to create certain kinds of changes over a relatively short (and often intense) period of time, in service of a specific goal, and done with a quite small number of people. Some of the points here apply to other Pagan settings, but I think it will probably be fairly clear which is which.)

Part 1 has some background about my own experiences and experience working with chronic (and emerging) medical issues in the context of my religious witchcraft work. This part was brought about by someone who wrote a letter of interest to me about group work, and as part of that, wondered about how much detail about health issues was important. This is something I discuss in some detail on the current group information pages, but I felt it deserved to be broken out in a little more detail.

Much more below…

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Health and Craft – the personal bit

Hello, dear fearless readers of this blog. I realise I haven’t updated here since May. It’s been a complicated summer, as I’m job hunting again. (Which thus far has involved two trips out of state for interviews, plus all the ordinary stuff like resumes and cover letters and so on. If you know people hiring librarians passionate about connecting people with information they care about in either the Upper Midwest or New England, feel free to drop me a note. )

The other part is something I talked about back in March, which is health issues. And reminded by a letter of introduction from someone potentially interested in group work with me, I thought I’d take a moment to lay out some of my thoughts about the intersection of health and Craft work. This part deals with the personal bit, and my internal observations, part 2 will deal with how I think this impacts group work more broadly.

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